Research Resource Discovery

Viewing: 476 - 500 of 8393.

Amazon Web Services: Implementing and Troubleshooting PaaS Products

Get up to speed with how to implement and troubleshoot the platform as a service (PaaS) products within Amazon Web Services (AWS). This course covers the primary PaaS components of AWS, going over each one, diving into implementation, and covering best practices. The topics covered include Identity and Access Management (IAM), CloudFormation, Elastic Beanstalk, and OpsWorks. This course can also help you prepare for the AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate exam.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Amazon Web Services Machine Learning Essential Training

Amazon Web Services (AWS) offers a wealth of services and tools that help data scientists leverage machine learning to craft better, more intelligent solutions. In this course, learn about patterns, services, processes, and best practices for designing and implementing machine learning using AWS. Instructor Lynn Langit takes a look at general machine learning concepts, including key machine learning algorithm types. She also examines available service types, such as AWS Machine Learning, Lex, Polly, and Rekognition, which you can use to predict image and video labels. Plus, she steps through how to work with platforms like AWS SageMaker, which includes hosted Jupyter notebooks.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Amazon Web Services: Monitoring and Metrics

Amazon Web Services (AWS)—a global leader in cloud computing—provides a wide variety of IT services. As you're financially responsible for whichever AWS services you use, it's important to establish sound financial monitoring to ensure that you're alerted to any changes before those changes become a financial burden. This course provides system administrators with an intermediate-level look at monitoring and metrics for the AWS platform. IT architect Sharif Nijim begins with monitoring tools like CloudWatch and includes coverage of VPC flow logs. He concludes with an introduction to Lambda and coverage of combining CloudWatch and Lambda.

This course is also part of a series designed to help you prepare for the AWS Certified SysOps Administrator – Associate certification exam.

This course includes trademarks owned by Amazon Web Services. This course has not been prepared, approved, or endorsed by Amazon Web Services.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Amazon Web Services: Networking

Adopting a cloud infrastructure strategy includes configuring a network that meets the needs of your organization. Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a cost-reducing solution that provides tools so you can build a data center with secure cloud networking technology. This course offers advice for technical managers and step-by-step instructions for system administrators and full-stack engineers. Learn how to establish private connections, set up a virtual private cloud, deploy an Internet gateway, create security groups, work with access control lists, and more. Join IT architect Sharif Nijim as he takes you through foundational networking concepts and beyond so you can gain a broader and deeper sense of effective strategies and tools you can use.

This course is also part of a series designed to help you prepare for the AWS Certified SysOps Administrator – Associate certification exam.

This course includes trademarks owned by Amazon Web Services. This course has not been prepared, approved, or endorsed by Amazon Web Services.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Amazon Web Services Provisioning (Engineering)

Description from Amazon: Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a secure cloud services platform, offering compute power, database storage, content delivery and other functionality. It is effectively a datacenter in the cloud. Campus has a contract to allow use of AWS on campus accounts and with a discount.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Engineering IT
Type: Research Computing

Amazon Web Services: Storage and Data Management

Amazon Web Services offers solutions that are ideal for managing data on a sliding scale—from small businesses to big data applications. This course teaches system administrators the intermediate-level skills they need to successfully manage data in the cloud with AWS: configuring storage, creating backups, enforcing compliance requirements, and managing the disaster recovery process. The training can also be used as preparation for the Data Management domain within the AWS Certified SysOps Administrator exam.

Join AWS architect Brandon Rich and learn how to configure object storage solutions and lifecycle management in Simple Storage Service (S3), a web service offered by AWS, and migrate, back up, and replicate relational data in RDS. Find out how to leverage flexible network storage with Elastic File System (EFS), and use the new AWS Glue service to move and transform data. Plus, learn how Snowball can help you transfer truckloads of data in and out of the cloud.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Amazon Workspaces: Deploy Virtual Desktops

Learn about the capabilities of Amazon WorkSpaces as a remote desktop solution. In this course, instructor Lynn Langit helps to acquaint you with this fully managed desktop as a service (DaaS) solution, as well as other Amazon services that support virtualization. Lynn shows how to use default images and shares best practices for creating custom images. She also discusses WorkSpaces authentication and deployment, shares monitoring tips and techniques, explains how to use WorkDocs with WorkSpaces, and more.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Amazon Workspaces: Deploy Virtual Desktops

Learn about the capabilities of Amazon WorkSpaces as a remote desktop solution. In this course, instructor Lynn Langit helps to acquaint you with this fully managed desktop as a service (DaaS) solution, as well as other Amazon services that support virtualization. Lynn shows how to use default images and shares best practices for creating custom images. She also discusses WorkSpaces authentication and deployment, shares monitoring tips and techniques, explains how to use WorkDocs with WorkSpaces, and more.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

A Mix Engineer's Glossary of Techniques

Mix engineers know what it's like to put a lot of work into a mix, anticipate a review, and then receive feedback filled with descriptive notes from industry execs. Inside the remarks is an intent that needs to be deciphered so that the right adjustments can be made to achieve the intended sound. Likewise, industry execs—managers, agents, or interested parties—also want to make sure the comments conveyed to the mix engineer use the lingo commonly used across studios in industry. This course helps both: mix engineers can learn how to interpret the meaning of comments and then modify a mix accordingly, and executives can learn how to provide constructive notes using industry-standard terminology, resulting in simpatico communication that ultimately elevates the quality of music being mixed.

Join multiplatinum producer, engineer, and mixer Brian Malouf as he covers the many terms that musicians and non-musicians use to describe music. Brian explains the meaning behind the comments and also demonstrates techniques that can be applied to a mix in response to the notes. He covers lo-fi mix techniques, EQ techniques, changes to levels, adapting the ambience, making vibe and energy adjustments, working with compression options, and revising the placement location of elements in the sonic sphere.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Analog Photography: Setting Up a Home Darkroom

More and more photographers are discovering—or rediscovering—the pleasures of analog photography. A great first step is to shoot and process black-and-white film, then scan the results and work with the images in a computer. After you've done that, it's time for the next step: setting up your own darkroom and making black-and-white enlargements.

In this course, photographer and educator Konrad Eek builds on his Shooting and Processing Black-and-White Film course to show the equipment, steps, and techniques involved in setting up a darkroom and making your own prints. From essential gear and setup considerations to processing techniques, this course is a complete introduction to the pleasures of black-and-white printing.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Analog Photography: Shooting & Processing Black-and-White Film

Photographers shoot film for its unique look; its constraints, which require discipline and careful self-editing; and the simple fact that developing film is fun and gratifying. And you don't need a darkroom to do it. In this course, photographer and master printer Konrad Eek provides an introduction to the pleasures of shooting and processing black-and-white film. The course begins with a look at gear and film cameras, which are inexpensive and widely available at thrift stores and secondhand shops. Next, we accompany Konrad on a photo shoot in the mountains of Arkansas, where he demonstrates important concepts such as metering and the use of filters.

Upon returning home, Konrad processes the film, explaining the chemicals involved and sharing insights for getting reliable results. He also describes the negative-scanning process. Finally, to whet your appetite for the other facets of film-based photography, he demonstrates the process of making a silver-gelatin enlargement and offers up some tips on building your own darkroom.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTS-Image Quant LAS 4010

The LAS 4010 Luminescent image analyzer is primarily used to document gels. Using a 16 Bit, 3.2megapixel camera, F0.85 lens, filters and transmitted and epi illumination this system is ideally suited for chemiluminescence, luminescence and transmitted light imaging.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB)
Type: Instrument

Analyzing Big Data with Hive

Businesses thrive by making informed decisions that target the needs of their customers and users. To make such strategic decisions, they rely on data. Hive is a tool of choice for many data scientists because it allows them to work with SQL, a familiar syntax, to derive insights from Hadoop, reflecting the information that businesses seek to plan effectively.

This course shows how to use Hive to process data. Instructor Ben Sullins starts by showing you how to structure and optimize your data. Next, he explains how to get Hue, the Hadoop user interface, to leverage HiveQL when analyzing data. Using the newly configured option, he then demonstrates how to load data, create aggregate tables for fast query access, and run advanced analytics. He also takes you through managing tables and putting functions to use. This course is designed to help you find new ways to work with datasets so you can answer the tough data science questions that come your way.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Analyzing Sales Competitors

There is more to keeping an eye on your competitors than just knowing their products and features. What is their messaging like? What value are they adding? What are their unique differentiators? In this course, Jeff Bloomfield helps you analyze your sales competition. It starts with understanding your buyer's point of view, and then being honest when making comparisons.

Jeff shows how tools like LinkedIn and Google Alerts can help you stay up to date on your competition's personnel and product updates, and how you can take advantage of the webinars, presentations, and other resources presented by your competition. Last, while competitor information is critical, it's ultimately more important for you to remember the value that your company brings. Jeff closes by explaining how you can best sell your company's products and services: by not getting too distracted by the competition.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Analyzing Your Website to Improve SEO

In this course, search engine optimization (SEO) expert Peter Kent walks step-by-step through the process of reviewing the content and markup of an existing web site to improve its ranking in search engine results. This course offers a consultant's take on how to analyze each component—from keywords to content to code—and determine what improvements are necessary to become more visible to search engines like Yahoo!, Bing, and Google.

This course was updated on 10/12/2012.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android 6.0 New Features for Developers

Find out what Android 6.0 (Marshmallow) has to offer app developers like you. Google has updated their robust mobile operating system with even more new features, including new project templates in Android Studio, an enhanced permissions framework, automatic backups for app data, and many smaller enhancements that are designed to make developers' lives easier.

In this short training course, David Gassner shows how to authenticate users using device credentials or the fingerprint scanner, configure apps for backup, test backups to Google servers, and use app links, website associations, and voice interactions. Plus, learn how to control data display in activity layouts with the new data-binding framework.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Accessibility

Learn how to create applications that everyone—regardless of their abilities—can independently interact with and enjoy. In this course, join instructor Renato Iwashima as he steps through the fundamentals of digital accessibility and usability for the Android platform. Renato provides a quick introduction to digital accessibility, explaining what it is, why it's important, and how to work with accessibility features such as TalkBack and Switch Access. He also covers the key principles of universal design and explains how to implement the fundamentals of accessibility and usability; add meaning and operability to user controls; improve the user experience for accessibility services; and test your Android app for accessibility.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Accessibility

Learn how to create applications that everyone—regardless of their abilities—can independently interact with and enjoy. In this course, join instructor Renato Iwashima as he steps through the fundamentals of digital accessibility and usability for the Android platform. Renato provides a quick introduction to digital accessibility, explaining what it is, why it's important, and how to work with accessibility features such as TalkBack and Switch Access. He also covers the key principles of universal design and explains how to implement the fundamentals of accessibility and usability; add meaning and operability to user controls; improve the user experience for accessibility services; and test your Android app for accessibility.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Animations and Transitions

The Android SDK offers many ways to create visually compelling animations and screen transitions for mobile apps. This course starts with an overview of the different animation techniques and APIs, and then offers hand-on instruction using each one. David Gassner covers defining view animations in XML declarations and in Java code; animating frame by frame with images; animating object properties over time or in response to an event with tweened calculations; building simple transitions between activities; and using the new transitions framework that was introduced in Android 4.4 KitKat.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Communicating with the User

Knowing how and when to display communications in your Android app can ensure your users enjoy a smooth user experience with a predictable and reliable flow. Join Joe Marini in this course and learn how to give your users the information they need at the right time. Joe demonstrates how to communicate to your users using toast messages, snackbars, and dialogs depending on if you want the user to acknowledge or confirm information. He explains how to handle events using notifications, how to customize layouts, and how to work with action buttons. He also shares the benefits and drawbacks of each feature so you can select the right method for the best user experience.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Data Persistence Libraries

By persisting your data, you can provide users with a more seamless experience with your app—even when they go offline. If you're an Android app developer, you have many data persistence options to choose from. In this course, learn about various options for storing your app's data in a database.

To begin, Annyce Davis reviews using the de facto data persistence solution available on Android: SQLite. She takes you through basic SQLite concepts—such as how to create a database wrapper and insert data into a table—as well as a few more advanced topics. Next, she covers working with Cupboard, an open-source project dedicated to simplifying your SQLite interactions. To wrap up, she dives into working with Realm, an object database solution designed with mobile devices in mind. Throughout the course, Annyce discusses establishing relationships between database tables, creating and running queries, as well as performing data migrations.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Design Patterns for Mobile Architecture

Developers need to know how to manage an app's complexity. In this course, learn how to simplify your apps by applying simple architectural design patterns to your mobile code base. Discover how these design patterns can help you reduce bugs and maximize your development time by making your code easier to read and test. Jon Bott covers different architectural models such as MVC, MVP, and VIPER. In addition, he walks through the conversion process from MVC to a layered architecture, covering dependency injection, the coordinator pattern, and data binding.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Distributing Android Apps (2014)

Once you've created an Android app, you can distribute it in multiple ways, but the primary channel is the Google Play store. In this course, David Gassner shows you how to prepare, package, and publish your Android app on Google Play, and provides a brief overview of the alternatives offered by Amazon and Barnes & Noble. The first step is to prepare the app for distribution, including cleaning up code, adding licensing and encryption, and exporting an application package (APK) file. The course then shows how to register as an Android developer, upload your app, set pricing, and publish the app. You'll also learn how to track app usage, including usage statistics, revenue, and crash reporting. David also includes a chapter on using Amazon's developer portal to distribute your app through the Amazon Appstore.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Distributing Android Apps (2015)

Once you've created an Android app, you can distribute it in multiple ways, but the primary channel is through the Google Play Store. In this course, updated for 2015, David Gassner shows you how to publish your app on Google Play and provides a brief overview of the alternatives offered by Amazon and other vendors. The process starts with packaging the app for distribution, sideloading an application package (APK) file on your own devices for testing, and implementing some basic protections. Then you'll learn to publish your app on Google Play, where you'll set pricing and track app usage. The final chapter contains information for developers who are also interested in distributing apps through Amazon.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Android App Development: Enterprise Integration

When developing Android applications for enterprise, security is paramount. Applications need to be able to integrate with existing mobile device management (MDM) systems-which companies rely on to control access to their data. Offering enterprise integration options can open untapped opportunities for your apps. This course shows you how to leverage your existing Android development skills and build apps for this valuable market.

Instructor Jon-Luke West first reviews the key concepts of enterprise mobility management in Android: important APIs, the role of the device administrator, and the types of devices you should plan to target. He reviews the three primary use cases, including bring your own device (BYOD) and corporate-owned single-use (COSU) scenarios. Then he dives straight into the code, showing how to implement three enterprise integration features: managed application configurations, app pinning, and locked task mode. Finally, he shows how to test the features on a managed device.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource



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