Research Resource Discovery

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Animate CC: Animating Scenes

After you've created a storyboard for your animated project, you're ready to tackle the next phase of the pipeline—actually assembling your scenes and rigging your characters. In this course, learn how to use Adobe Animate CC to assemble and animate a scene, and set up a complex rig for both a human character and a robot. Dermot O'Connor shows how to properly line a character, place the pivots, and set up the scene symbol. Plus, he shows how to animate a dynamic action scene, import audio, and export your scene.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animate CC: Storyboarding

Studios can create enormous problems if they begin projects in a disorderly manner. By creating a thoughtful, detailed storyboard, you can clarify your ideas and get your project off on the right foot. In this course, learn how to set up a storyboard in Adobe Animate CC. Dermot O'Connor demonstrates how to set up your project, do fades and cross dissolves, create vertical pan shots, work with characters like marching robot monsters), add and edit audio, and more.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating 2D Characters: Harmony to Unity

Toon Boom Harmony is an award-winning industry-standard program for animating 2D cartoons. But Harmony also has the tools to create animations for games. By partnering with Unity, Toon Boom has created a pipeline in which you can now rig and animate characters in Harmony, and then export those animations to be used in Unity's game engine. Learn how in this course with motion comics artist, animator, and teacher Tony Ross. Tony shows you the basics of rigging characters, animating with bone defomers and pegs, and prepping files for use in Unity. Finally, learn how to import and test out your character moves and animations in a simple Unity game environment.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating a Landscape with VUE

Rendering a photorealistic animated landscape is possible with VUE, a powerful application for creating computer-generated natural environments needed for visual effects, animation, architectural visualization, and illustration. In this course, Aaron F. Ross demonstrates the VUE workflow for digital nature, including interoperability with other 3D programs, terrain sculpting, populating the scene with plants, daylighting and atmospheres, complex material functions, keyframe animation, and production rendering.

Realistic skies and lighting are achieved with the VUE photometric spectral atmosphere model. This course covers adding animation to plants, water, and clouds with procedural wind effects. Aaron also shows how to create camera movement by employing the Timeline's intuitive tools, including animation and curve editing. Rendering many animation frames poses challenges not experienced with still image rendering, and so the course concludes with key strategies for optimizing the balance between image quality and rendering time.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating Cartoon Characters in Maya

Now that you've rigged your characters, it's time to make them move. Starting from where Modeling a Cartoon Character in Maya left off, George Maestri teaches five simple steps to creating exaggerated cartoon animation in Maya. Using the rig developed in the previous course, he shows how to animate a walk, create a jump, animate changes in facial expression and posture, animate a "zip out" or quick exit, and then show how to finalize and render the complete project. Throughout the course, George touches on animation principles such as squash and stretch, exaggeration, follow-through, and overlapping action.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating Characters in Toon Boom Animate

This course is an introduction to creating and animating cutout characters in Toon Boom Animate. Author Tony Ross shows how to use the Toon Boom toolset to create cutout characters, and explains how to leverage a few rules of traditional animation to help bring the characters to life. He shows how to create mouth shapes for dialogue, add realistic eye movement, and animate a full cycle. The final chapter shows how to create foreground and backgrounds for your character and export a simple, animated scene.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating Characters with Mecanim in Unity 3D

Learn to bring your 3D game characters to life with the help of Mecanim, Unity's new character animation system. Start by importing characters and mapping their bone and muscle structure. Create animation controllers and add existing animations to help them move through and interact with their environment. Learn how to blend and mask animation clips to create sophisticated in-game animations on the fly. Author Sue Blackman guides you through the intricacies of Mecanim as you learn to control an assortment of game characters in a variety of situations.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating for Unity 3D in 3ds Max

Learn how to establish a clear production pipeline to transition your characters from 3ds Max to the Unity 3D game engine. Author Adam Crespi shows you how to export three different rig systems from 3ds Max (standard bone, Character Studio, and CAT), define what parts of the model transition over, and verify and configure the import in Unity. Plus, learn to split clips and transition between states with Unity's Mecanim animation system.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating in 2D: Breakdowns and Thumbnails

When you plan scenes in advance by animating breakdowns and thumbnails, you can enhance the quality of your animation and add interest to your scenes. In this course, Dermot O' Connor shares his time-tested techniques for animating breakdowns and thumbnails. Dermot begins by going over the basic principles, and then moves on to a discussion of breakdowns-including basic turns and reactions. He wraps up the course by covering basic, intermediate, and advanced thumbnail concepts.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating in 2D: Hair and Clothing

Hair and clothing are some of the most important but difficult details to animate. These features make the difference between engaging, life-like characters and stiff, boring ones. This course pulls together a professional animator's time-tested techniques for animating hair, fur, clothing, flags, and other secondary animation items. Dermot O' Connor explains the difference between primary and secondary animation, and helps you create smooth secondary motion that amplifies the interest and realism of your 2D characters.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animating in 3ds Max: Constraints, Controllers, and Wire Parameters

Autodesk 3ds Max boasts a robust set of animation tools that can be used to bring characters, machinery, and even environments to life. In this course, get acquainted with some of the fundamental tools that can be used to both create and control animations. To make this course as practical as possible, instructor Brian Bradley introduces each tool (or set of tools) in a practical exercise that helps you see the tool in action. He covers working with controllers, creating reactions, using motion capture, working with constraints and wire parameters, and more.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animation Foundations: Drawing Cartoon Characters

Learn to draw cartoon characters for classical cel animation, digital animation, comic books, or just for fun. In this course, Dermot O' Connor reviews the basics of character drawing and the principals that underlie effective characters: silhouette, exaggeration, squash and stretch, asymmetry, texture, line weight, and more. Then he focuses on drawing individual body parts—eyes, mouths, hands, and hair—as well as different types of animals, creatures, and objects. Finally, watch Dermot take a drawing from start to finish, creating a memorable character ready for handoff to animators.

Follow along with your favorite illustration program, your Wacom tablet, or paper and pen.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animation Foundations: Fundamentals

Dig into the roots of animation in this course for animators, motion graphics artists, and visual effects designers of all levels. Author George Maestri reviews the basic concepts of animation and what makes things move—and the features you'll find in almost every animation package, including X, Y, and Z planes, keyframes, animation paths, hierarchies, pivots, and rotation. Plus, learn time-tested techniques that bring your animations to life, such as easing, squash and stretch, exaggeration, staging, and the importance of timing.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animation Foundations: Gesture

What makes a great animated character? One key component is gesture. Gestures are how we express ideas or feelings through the body; creating natural gestures makes our characters feel believable. Directing animator Andrew Gordon, currently at Pixar, walks us through the principles of gesture in animation, from hand and facial gestures to whole body poses. He shows how to incorporate reference material, add physicality, and avoid clichés. In chapter 2, he'll help you add polish to your animated scenes, making the poses cleaner and maximizing the character's interaction with their environment. Plus, take two challenges to practice your acting and observation skills. This course is software-neutral and features reference footage of actors and examples from well-known films, as well as clips created just for the class.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animation Foundations: Storyboarding

Storyboard artists tell the story of an animated cartoon. They illustrate the script, plan shots, demonstrate action, and maintain continuity between scenes. Becoming a storyboard artist starts with the foundations: an understanding of film grammar (including types of shots, acts, sequences, and transitions) and techniques for illustrating action, angles, composition, character, and drama. In this course, Dermot O' Connor demonstrates all these fundamentals and more, using a software-agnostic approach that combines theory with practical technique. Watch the lessons come together in the final animatic, and then download the free exercise files to start practicing on your own.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animation Pipeline Production

Losing files is terrible for anyone but losing animation-work that you've spent 500 or 1,000 hours on-can be crippling. In this course, David Andrade introduces a production workflow that will help you mitigate disasters and get projects done on time. He covers the creative and technical aspects of animation, including scripting, storyboarding, layout, file management, and rendering. Each step is shown in context in the production pipeline, allowing you to see how software like After Effects, Maya, and Blender fit together. Use the pipeline to solve your unique creative and technical challenges and develop a customized production workflow to suit your personal style.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

Animation Pipeline Production

Losing files is terrible for anyone but losing animation-work that you've spent 500 or 1,000 hours on-can be crippling. In this course, David Andrade introduces a production workflow that will help you mitigate disasters and get projects done on time. He covers the creative and technical aspects of animation, including scripting, storyboarding, layout, file management, and rendering. Each step is shown in context in the production pipeline, allowing you to see how software like After Effects, Maya, and Blender fit together. Use the pipeline to solve your unique creative and technical challenges and develop a customized production workflow to suit your personal style.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz: 1 The Big Picture

If you are looking to do something big in the music business, something great, getting your head around the big picture is one of the most important elements of success. It's not about marketing and promotion, how to make records, how to book a tour, or how to manage your social media. Those are all important pieces of the puzzle if you want to be successful. But it's been Steve Rennie's experience—from working in the music biz over 36 years—that if you can understand how the music business works, what's really important, then the rest of the pieces will fall in line.

This course kicks off An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz, a series of 9 courses designed to teach the ins and outs of the music business to bands, managers, and songwriters. Here, Steve provides tips on assessing your talent, committing to a plan, picking partners, figuring out financials, finding ideas, and surviving in what can be a tough business. Steve's experience, and his honest take on the ups and downs of the industry, will help anyone interested in breaking through be better prepared for the realities of getting by in the music biz.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz: 2 Making Great Music

The music business is built around great songs by great artists. The music business exists to bring those songs to life. Managers, producers, engineers, record labels, promoters, publishers, and concert venues: They're all there to help connect music with audiences. But the songs don't write themselves.

This installment of An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz is designed for songwriters who want to make great music, and for industry professionals who want to understand the process behind it. Music insider Steve Rennie provides tips on what makes a great song, what a successful writing process looks like, the costs involved in recording, and the role of a producer. Steve's experience, and his honest take on the industry, will help anyone interested in getting their music into the hands of music biz movers and shakers.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz: 3 Treating Your Career as a Business

Doing something you're passionate about and making a living out of it is a difficult thing to do. Especially considering the long odds in the music business. But with a focused, business-minded approach to your career, you can optimize your chances for success. In this installment of An Insider's Guide to the Music Biz, Steve Rennie explains how to approach the music business with the mindset of an entrepreneur and look at a career in music as a business.

He talks about hobby versus career and the key elements of success in the business world, from distribution and marketing to management and finance. He gives you some thoughts about how you apply those things to your music career. Since successful businesses don't happen overnight—they develop over time in identifiable stages—Steve also covers the stages of development in the business life cycle and how that applies to your music career. Last but not least, he offers tips on drafting a band agreement that will keep the relationships professional and strong.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz: 4 Building a Professional Team

Picking a great team of professionals is one of the most important and impactful decisions you are going to make in your music career. Steve Rennie knows music professionals; he has over 35 years in the music business. His series, An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz, teaches the ins and outs of the music business to bands, managers, and songwriters. In this installment, you'll learn about the key players you need on your team and what they do, how much they get paid, how you find them, and when you need them. It starts with perhaps the most important member of your team, the manager. Steve also explains the role of lawyers, agents, business managers, publicists, and the digital team in charge of PR, social media, and other online distribution and promotion strategies.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz: 5 Managers

Most artists know they need a great manager. But finding one is tough. Before focusing on who your manager will be, you need to look at the what, where, why, and when of the manager's role. Once you understand those job requirements, it will make identifying a manager a lot easier.

This installment of Steve Rennie's series, An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz, talks about the artist-manager relationship and how to get the most out of it, whether you are an artist or other music professional. Learn how to get the attention of managers, the right questions to ask when you meet with a manager, and the important things to think about when you hire your manager.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz: 6 Marketing and Promotion

How to stand out from the crowd has always been the great challenge in the music business. It was true back when the record industry released 5,000 records a year and it's even more true now that millions of artists are creating and distributing music. Marketing and promotion is what gets your music in front of music consumers. Marketing is about telling your story; promotion is about ongoing efforts that keep your story top of mind.

In this class, industry insider Steve Rennie talks about how to market and promote your music and turn music consumers into permanent fans. He'll talk about the key elements of any good marketing plan, whether you are a major label or indie artist. He'll also talk about how to craft your image with your music, photos, and videos and how you can assemble them in a way that gives you the best chance of success. Plus, learn how radio, touring, publicity campaigns, and your web presence play into a music marketing mix.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz: 7 Record Labels

Record labels have a valuable role to play in the music businesses. Despite the controversies around contracts and creative license, they are not going away. Understanding what record labels do is important whether you are an artist or a music professional.

In this installment of An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz, Steve Rennie explores the role of record labels in the music business. He starts by talking about the different types of record labels and what they do, from marketing to manufacturing and radio promotion. Then you'll learn about why you need a record label, how to get a record deal, what a music contract will look like, and how the signing process works. As a little bonus, Steve gives you some insights on your commitments and compensation (advances and royalties) once you get signed.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource

An Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz: 8 Music Publishing

One of the most important aspects of the music biz is music publishing. It can also be one of the most complicated parts of the business to understand, even for the most seasoned veteran.

In this Insider's Guide to Today's Music Biz, Steve Rennie explains what you'll need to know about music publishing to turn your songs into money. He'll talk about copyrights and their value, and why music publishing is important to a successful artist's career.

He also talks about the main sources of publishing income: what they are, who pays, and how much you get. He explains the difference between performing rights organizations and music publishers and how to find and make publishing deals. Start with the first lesson, which explains how a dollar of publishing income is split between the songwriter and publisher.

Affiliation: UIUC
Provider: Lynda.com
Type: Streaming Resource



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